How To Writing: App Smashing With A Publishing Menu

How To Writing: App Smashing With A Publishing Menu

After our collaborative How To writing project, everyone was quick to get started on their own “expert” stories. Making lists of things we’re experts at helps generate ideas, then the stories start to flow!

App Smashing How To Stories - A Publishing Menu

We’ve published our writing several different ways this year, so I offered an idea menu of apps to publish with to my class. This is by no means a comprehensive list of tools. I just wanted to provide them a jumping off point to get started when they were ready to publish. Please feel free to download the menu here.

We use this menu as a talking / planning tool during a publishing conference. I sit down with each student and we read through their work looking for ways to revise and edit. Then, when it’s just right, we make a plan for them to publish. This is always a messy process! I’m on the floor working with a few students at a time, a pile of papers surrounding us, and other students coming up for advice or to proudly share their work. It’s a bit of a hot mess, but it’s so rewarding for all of us. The app menu does a great job of helping students choose, or sparking other ideas. It’s also nice because they can walk away with it and remember each pice of their plan.

A Few of Our Favorite Tools –

Explain Everything & Pixabay:

One student published this brilliant How To about carving pumpkins. She downloaded all the images from PIxabay.com, then animated them in Explain Everything to tell her story.

Adobe Voice App Smash:

This simple production of How To Play the Piano is accompanied by piano music that was easily added in Adobe Voice. The pictures were done in MoMA Art Lab. Arrows and labels were added with Skitch.

Adding Skitch:

I love how students used Skitch and Adobe Voice in different ways. This student chose to take pictures of here work, then augment them with Skitch before creative a video story.

After all the stories were ready, I put the links onto a ThingLink so that we could easily share them for our writer’s celebration. We love organizing our work this way!

 

MZ Sig

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